Sapphire Industry Watch – April 17

  • Video: The Apple Watch’s sapphire display survives an insane power drill test – BGR: In an effort to prove just how indestructible the sapphire display of the Apple Watch is, iPhonefixed made a video of a purported Apple Watch sapphire display enduring aggressive rubbing against a stone wall and a power drill, amongst other abusive tests. In the end, the Apple Watch display is shown 100 percent intact, surviving without a single scuff or scratch.
  • Check out the light emerging from these Dublin landmarks – thejournal.ie: A team of professors at Trinity College Dublin have estimated that over 2.2. million units of electricity are wasted per year across Ireland in illuminating areas such as public parks and gardens. According to the Dublin City Council, the biggest source of light pollution comes from low pressure sodium light bulbs. To remedy the situation, there is a proposal to replace all of the low pressure sodium lights with LED lights over the next few years.
  • US LED lighting market to reach $5.2bn in 2015, driven by declining LED prices and government initiatives – Semiconductor Today: Continued innovation over the last decade has led to the overall growth of LEDs in the general lighting market. According to TechSci Research, due to continuously declining LED prices, US government initiatives and increasing consumer inclination towards the adoption of green technologies, the US LED lighting market could grow to $5.2bn in 2015.
  • Oklahoma City Hall park to get makeover – The Oklahoman: The park surrounding Oklahoma City Hall is set to undergo a much needed makeover. The main feature of the park, the fountain, which dates back to the opening of City Hall in 1937, will be rebuilt with new nozzles, mechanical systems and LED lighting.

LEDs and Location – A New Way to Shop

Location, location, location. Location-based applications have matured a great deal since early navigation devices like Garmin and Magellan GPSs.  Location-based applications are very popular in smart phones. Using the location-based applications, you can tell your friends where you are and can find the nearest coffee shop.  These applications typically use a GPS chip inside the phone or even location technology called U-TDOA (uplink time difference of arrival). These are the same location technologies used for e-911.

The next generation of location based applications are moving indoors. These new apps can bring all kinds of new uses to the typical smart phone. Because these applications are used inside, they can’t rely on GPS or U-TDOA because these technologies need line-of-sight where walls and other obstructions can limit their effectiveness. These next generation indoor location apps rely on new location technologies such as Near Field Communications (NFC), a new version of Bluetooth called Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacon technology, RFID and even LEDs.

ABI Research predicts that the indoor location market will reach $4 billion US in 2018. Big companies are exploring the indoor location market.  Apple and eBay have announced that they’re going to use BLE iBeacon. Apple is actively looking to establish an iBeacon program that can leverage its installed base of iPhones and iTouch devices to provide mobile transactions and offers to retailers and their customers. Retailers such as Macy’s and American Eagle Outfitters are testing iBeacon.  Major League Baseball announced a new agreement to use iBeacon for the upcoming baseball season using Qualcomm hardware.

How do LEDs fit in? Several companies are looking to leverage light.  Philips is looking at one-way communication between networked LED-based luminaires and customers’ smartphones and a new system from ByteLight that uses a LED light fixture to communicate a unique identifier to individuals with smart phones using tiny pulses of light.

Philips recently shared a demo that uses a supermarket scenario using indoor location technology to guide a customer around a store to gather items for a recipe, and allows the store to send special coupons or offers to customers based on their location in the store.  The technology would operate based on the instantaneous response of LEDs in on-off cycles that could transmit data to the camera of a smartphone using light changes undetectable to humans in the store. The customer would need to download an app on their smart phone. Like the ByteLight application, the communication link from the LED luminaires to the smartphone would deliver location data and other offers.

Here’s a diagram from Philips that illustrates how their LED location application would work in a grocery store.

Philips Connected Retail Lighting System

Philips Connected Retail Lighting System

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Further Reading

LEDsMagazine, Philips Lighting demonstrates LED-based indoor location detection, technology, http://www.ledsmagazine.com/articles/2014/02/philips-lighting-demonstrates-led-based-indoor-location-detection-technology.html

RFID Journal, Retailers Test ByteLight’s Light-Based Indoor Positioning Technology, http://www.rfidjournal.com/articles/view?11474

FierceMobileIT, Indoor location market to reach $4 billion in 2018, predicts ABI, http://www.fiercemobileit.com/story/indoor-location-market-reach-4-billion-2018-predicts-abi/2013-10-18#ixzz2v7TLbqKe

Sapphire Inside: Apple Builds Sapphire Lens into New Home Button, Touch ID

iPhone 5S with the Touch ID includes a sapphire lens

iPhone 5S with the Touch ID includes a sapphire lens on the home button

Today, Apple announced two new models of the iPhone, the iPhone 5S and  the iPhone 5C. One of the biggest news items at the Apple event is that the new iPhone 5S will sport a whole new home button with a fingerprint sensor with a sapphire lens, ringed in stainless steel.

Sapphire, the second hardest material on Earth after the diamond, is scratch resistant, so it should be very well suited for use as a lens. While this is great news for the sapphire community, this is not the only use for sapphire in a smart phone. Many smart phone OEMs already use sapphire for the camera lens cover because of its scratch resistance, but also is used for the LEDs in the backlighting for the screens as well as the silicon-on-sapphire (SOS)-based RFIC chips that power the RF antennas. There are more places for use of sapphire in a smart phone as well since OEMS are looking to use SOS chips for digitally tunable capacitors (DTCs) and power amplifiers. And, don’t forget sapphire’s largest overall market, LEDs, for lighting, displays and more.

Apple claims that Touch ID reads a fingerprint at an entirely new level by scanning sub-epidermal skin layers with 360 degree reading capabilities.  The sensor is part of the home button which is 170 microns thick with a 500 ppi resolution.  Touch ID stores the encrypted fingerprint info securely in a “secure enclave” inside the new A7 chip, the new processor for the iPhone 5S.  The neat thing is that it should be able to store multiple fingers.  The Touch ID will enable you to purchase items on iTunes, the AppStore or iBooks without a password.

You can see where the sapphire is in this photo of the home button from CNet’s live blog of the Apple event:

iPhone 5S graphic illustrates parts of the Touch ID (from CNet)

iPhone 5S graphic illustrates parts of the Touch ID (from CNet) with sapphire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The iPhone 5S (and the 5C) go on pre-sale on September 13th and will be on sale in stores on September 20th.

For Further Reading

Engadget, iPhone 5S fingerprint sensor called Touch ID, recognizes your thumb on the Home button: here’s how it works and what it does, http://www.engadget.com/2013/09/10/iphone-5s-fingerprint-sensor/