LED Applications – Celebrating the Royal Birth in LEDs

London and the world celebrated the birth of the latest heir to the British throne, Prince George Alexander Louis, in style with LEDs.  A number of landmarks in London turned blue to celebrate the occasion and even a few outside of the UK turned blue in honor of the future king.  For a video, go to this BBC story.

The 600 foot tall BT Tower used more than 500K LEDs for the announcement:

royal baby BT Tower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The famous London Eye ferris wheel turned red, white and blue:

Royalblu_381

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fountain at Trafalgar Square marked the occasion in blue:

Trafalgar square

 

 

 

 

 

Even the London Bridge turned blue:

London Bridge in Blue

 

 

 

 

 

Not to be outdone, North America celebrated too with Niagra Falls turning blue:

Niagra Falls Blue

 

 

 

 

 

Toronto’s CN Tower:

Toronto CN Tower

 

 

 

 

 

Christchurch Airport in New Zealand turned blue too.

Christchurch Airport NZ

 

 

 

 

 

For Further Reading and Viewing

The BBC, Royal baby: London landmarks turn blue for birth, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23416932 (video)

The Daily Mail, The world turns a Royal shade of blue, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2374793/Kate-Middleton-gives-birth-Royal-baby-boy-landmarks-globe-illuminated.html

New Applications for Sapphire: Medical (Part 2 of 3)

rod of asclepiusNew industries are finding man-made sapphire a desirable material. The field of medicine is looking at sapphire for its optical transmission range, durability and chemical inertness for bio-compatibility.

Sapphire’s optical properties and durability offer advantages for specific medical laser applications in dermatology, ophthalmology and dentistry. Sapphire is widely used in surgical systems for its laser transmission, high resistance to heat and non-thrombogenic properties (meaning it doesn’t promote clotting).  It is used as a laser window for endoscope lenses, laser hair removal systems and blood cell counters.  In addition, sapphire products are used for surgical tools, implants, braces.  Sapphire microscalpels are transparent blades that make it easier to visualize and illuminate capillary vessels, nerves, cutting zones and cutting depth compared with traditional metal alternatives.

One area that has potential for sapphire is in artificial joint replacements.  Many joint replacements include metal, ceramic, metal-polymer and ceramic polymer endoprosthesis. This is an area that may develop friction and wear over time causing the joint to fail.  Endoprostheses made of metal and ceramics may interact with the body and also degrade from friction over time.  For example, metal-on-metal artificial hips have a lifetime of 15 to 30 years, but have been known to fail earlier.  Sapphire is attractive for endoprostheses for its bio-compatibility since it is chemically inert and won’t react with the body as well as its low friction coefficient, hardness and durability

For Further Reading

The New York Times, The High Cost of Failing Artificial Hips, http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/28/business/the-high-cost-of-failing-artificial-hips.html?pagewanted=all

IMS Research/Rubicon Technology, White Paper: Opportunities for Sapphire, Jamie Fox, http://rubicontechnology.com/resources/papers,

Sapphire: Material, Manufacturing, Applications, by E. R. Dobrovinskaya, Leonid A. Lytvynov, V. V. Pishchik. Springer Sciences Business Media, ISBN: 978-1441946737.

Benefits of LED Lighting for Cows and Bees

CowsMany industries are looking at using LEDs, but researchers may have found some unexpected benefits of LED lighting for cows and bees.

Iowa Farmer Today reported that dairy cows produce more milk with LED lighting.  While it is still early, a 2010 Oklahoma State study comparing LED lighting to traditional light in dairies resulted in a 6% bump in milk production for the cows exposed to LED lighting.

The experiment compared a 500-cow free-stall barn outfitted with LEDs on one side and traditional metal halide lighting on the other.  Researchers found that cows responded positively to LED light with increased milk production.  Researchers observed that the directional light from LEDs provided the cows with a boost in feed intake.  The researchers don’t know if the increase in milk production is from the feed intake itself, or a possible increase in hormones that promote milk production. In order to prove that LED light increases milk production researchers will need to study further.  They’ll need to determine the effects of increased light, intensity and other variables as well as replicate the study at different facilities.

Pollination by bees is a necessary part of growing flowers and crops.  But bumble bees suffer from poor vision and sensitivity to certain wavelengths of light. In fact, northern climates have shorter growing seasons in part due to the lack of available natural light for pollinator bumble bees.  Use of artificial light sources in horticulture has been an issue due to the bumble bee’s limited vision under UVB, blue and green light.  Finding an artificial light source that works with pollinator bees will help horticulture in areas with limited natural light.

LED grow-light manufacturer Valoya demonstrated the functionality of their lights in a tomato trial at PlantResearch in Made, Netherlands.  The company compared pollinator bee activity in two compartments: one with LED lighting and another with only natural light. The bees in the LED compartment started flying out to flowers immediately when the AP67-LED lights were turned on.  The bees in compartments with high pressure sodium lights on (and an open hatch) only started to move 4 hours later when some natural light became available through the open hatch.  More study is needed, but LED-grow lights may prove effective to increase pollination time in areas with limited amounts of natural light.

For Further Reading

Iowa Farmer Today, Milking lighting to boost production, http://www.iowafarmertoday.com/news/dairy/milking-lighting-to-boost-production/article_4b824b94-028a-11e2-8a2d-001a4bcf887a.html

Valoya Press Release, Valoya’s Horticultural LED Lights Enable Pollinator Bees to Operate without Natural Light, http://www.valoya.com/document-repository/press-releases/document/valoyas-horticultural-led-lights-enable-pollinator-bees-to-operate-without-natural-light?format=raw

LEDs Magazine, Valoya claims additional benefits for LEDs in horticulture, bees like SSL, http://ledsmagazine.com/news/10/6/13

How Do They Do It? From Sapphire to LED Infographic

You’ve heard a lot about LEDs, but did you know that a tiny piece of sapphire – the pure, colorless industrial variety, not the blue gemstone – is in more than 80% of LEDs? Sapphire is the foundation for the LED chip, just as silicon is for a computer chip.  Rubicon Technology has put together an infographic that describes the sapphire manufacturing process and where sapphire is found in an LED. The bottom of the infographic features examples of products that feature LEDs for lighting. Click on the infographic below to see it larger.

Infographic for Post

 

 

 

 

 

Link to: http://www.rubicontechnology.com/sites/default/files/From%20Sapphire%20to%20LED%20Infographic.pdf

New Applications for Sapphire: Aerospace & Defense, Part 1 of 3

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Range of sapphire products available from Rubicon Technology including large optical windows and other shapes for aerospace and defense.

Sapphire’s unique properties make it a perfect material for high-performance applications due to its optical transparency, physical strength, resistance to abrasion and corrosion, temperature durability, chemical inertness, and bio-compatibility. As a result, it is perfectly suited for extreme environments where material durability is just as important as optical clarity.

One extreme use case is in the aerospace and defense industry where there’s a need for rugged windows for targeting pods and missile domes, most notably for the US F-35 fighter jet, that may come in contact with harsh conditions from the harsh, gritty desert with extremely high temperatures to high altitudes with extreme low temperatures.

Market research firm Yole Developpement determined that non-substrate applications for sapphire in the defense, semiconductor and other applications represent 25% of the sapphire industry revenue in a new study.  The market represents a solid growth opportunity for sapphire makers.

While there is opportunity, innovation is needed.  Sapphire traditionally has been limited to smaller shapes and sizes using traditional growth methods.  As sensor technology and applications, in defense and aerospace in particular, have evolved, the size requirements for sapphire windows have grown substantially.  One company that is innovating sapphire crystal growth is Rubicon Technology.

In a recent paper, Rubicon’s Dr. Jonathan Levine, Director of Technical Business Development, detailed how Rubicon successfully produced very large sapphire blanks using a highly modified horizontal directional solidification process. This new method, named the Large‐Area Netshape Crystal Extraction (LANCE) system is currently able to produce crystals of several different orientations. The company plans to produce sapphire windows as large as 36 x 18 x 0.8 inches.

For Further Reading

Clearlysapphire.com Blog, Opportunities for Sapphire: New Applications & Markets Explained, http://blog.clearlysapphire.com/?p=426

Clearlysapphire.com Blog, How Large Can You Go? Sapphire Windows Grow Up and Across, http://blog.clearlysapphire.com/?p=409

Rubicon Technology, Synthesis and characterization of large optical-grade sapphire windows produced from a horizontal growth process, http://www.rubicontechnology.com/sites/default/files/Synthesis%20and%20Characterization%20of%20Large%20Optical%20Grade%20Sapphire%20Windows.pdf