Sapphire – Quality Matters, Part 2: Transmission Quality

Recently, Novus Light Today published an article by Dr. Jonathan Levine, Director of Technical Business Development at Rubicon Technology, about sapphire quality.  His article shares a thorough review of the measures of sapphire quality for optical-grade applications.  Last week, we looked at the first two metrics, chemical analysis and X-ray rocking curves.  This week, we’ll look at transmission quality.

Levine writes that the quality of a sapphire is determined by how closely the grown crystal matches the ideal structure with respect to the arrangement of atoms within the lattice, dislocations, defects, and stress.  Root causes for these problems often originate from insufficient purity of the starting material and the growth process itself.

Sapphire exhibits excellent transmission in the ultraviolet (UV) to the mid-infrared (IR) range (~200 – 5000 nm).   According to Levine, conditions within the sapphire growth furnace can induce subtle interactions between the molten sapphire and the growth environment.  These interactions can produce bubbles, dislocations and other stresses that could impact optical performance.   Levine says that carefully controlling the growth environment produces sapphire that maintains excellent transmission at 200 nm through the mid-IR wavelengths.  He illustrates the impact of furnace interactions by comparing Rubicon’s ES-2 sapphire with another commercial sapphire maker’s crystal produced using a different growth method in the figure below.  From the image in the post, you can see a sharp absorption peak at 200 nm for sapphire produced by the commercial maker that is absent in sapphire grown by Rubicon.

Optical transmission of sapphire depicting a sharp absorption peak at 200 nm for sapphire produced by a commercial producer that is absent in sapphire grown by Rubicon.  Inset: Optical transmission for Rubicon sapphire from the visible to mid-IR range approaching 90% due to the high quality of the material.

Optical transmission of sapphire depicting a sharp absorption peak at 200 nm for sapphire produced by a commercial producer that is absent in sapphire grown by Rubicon. Inset: Optical transmission for Rubicon sapphire from the visible to mid-IR range approaching 90% due to the high quality of the material.

For Further Reading

Novus Light Today, Optical-Grade Sapphire, Where Quality Matters, http://www.novuslight.com/optical-grade-sapphire-where-quality-matters_N1596.html#sthash.giGipxT1.dpuf

Sapphire Quality Matters: Part 1

Sapphire is an extremely versatile material with a growing list of applications in a wide range of industries.  Sapphire suits optical applications because of its scratch resistance and its transmission characteristics.  You’ll find sapphire components such as lenses and windows in medical equipment, lasers, satellites, aircraft, flame detectors, smart phones, cameras and watches.  Recent advances in sapphire crystal growth technology and fabrication have improved the performance, purity, and availability of sapphire for all types of applications.

Recently, Novus Light Today published an article by Dr. Jonathan Levine, Director of Technical Business Development at Rubicon Technology, about sapphire quality.  His article gives a thorough review of the measures of sapphire quality for optical applications.  Levine writes that the quality of a sapphire is determined by how closely the grown crystal matches the ideal structure with respect to the arrangement of atoms within the lattice, dislocations, defects, and stress.  Root causes for these problems often originate from insufficient purity of the starting material and the growth process itself.

The effects of these variables in the final product are commonly quantified by three metrics: chemical analysis, X-ray rocking curves, and optical transmission.  Additionally, the observance of bubbles in the crystal provides a baseline from which crystal quality is determined because bubbles serve as scattering centers for any light transmitted through a sapphire optic, thus reducing its performance.

This week, we look at the first two metrics, chemical analysis and X-ray rocking curves.

Powdered aluminum oxide

Powdered aluminum oxide

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purity of the crystal is highly important.  According to Levine, the presence of certain elements can vary drastically between suppliers, and sapphire manufacturers must exercise proper quality control.  For example, titanium (Ti) and chromium (Cr) impurities can result in pink crystals.  In nature, these impurities lead to rubies and other variations of sapphire depending on the impurity.  Levine says trace amounts of these elements must be kept below 1 ppm.  Levine includes a graphic about other elements that can cause issues including silicon (Si), potassium (K), chlorine (Cl), iron (Fe), lithium (Li), and sodium (Na).  The data was collected using glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS).

Typically, a company can buy two types of raw material for crystal growth that can have impurities.  Levine says it can be purified alumina powder and/or Verneuil sapphire.  Rubicon has developed a new in-house purification process that converts the raw powder into densified pellets for crystal growth without an increase in cycle time or decrease in crystal yield. This process enables Rubicon to eliminate impurities in the alumina power that they use to make crystal.

Levine includes another useful metric for analyzing sapphire, rocking curve data obtained via X-ray diffraction.  A rocking curve helps measure various stresses in a crystal.  Levine says the width of the resulting peak is highly sensitive to strain and defects within the crystal.  A narrow peak, indicated by its full width at half maximum (FWHM) measured in arcseconds, signifies a high quality crystal free of low-angle grain boundaries and lattice strain.  A standard narrow rocking curve for Rubicon’s ES2 sapphire windows is shown below.

Sample rocking curve data from Rubicon ES2 sapphire.

Sample rocking curve data from Rubicon ES2 sapphire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What can introduce a poor rocking curve?  Levine says that high thermal gradients, fast growth rates, and impurities contributed by the surrounding insulation can introduce defects and stress into the crystal that subsequently yield poor results in rocking curve data.  He adds that accurately controlling the temperature gradient and maintaining a stable growth interface throughout the entire process can help make higher quality sapphire.

For Further Reading

Novus Light Today, Optical-Grade Sapphire, Where Quality Matters, http://www.novuslight.com/optical-grade-sapphire-where-quality-matters_N1596.html#sthash.giGipxT1.dpuf

Sapphire Inside: Apple Builds Sapphire Lens into New Home Button, Touch ID

iPhone 5S with the Touch ID includes a sapphire lens

iPhone 5S with the Touch ID includes a sapphire lens on the home button

Today, Apple announced two new models of the iPhone, the iPhone 5S and  the iPhone 5C. One of the biggest news items at the Apple event is that the new iPhone 5S will sport a whole new home button with a fingerprint sensor with a sapphire lens, ringed in stainless steel.

Sapphire, the second hardest material on Earth after the diamond, is scratch resistant, so it should be very well suited for use as a lens. While this is great news for the sapphire community, this is not the only use for sapphire in a smart phone. Many smart phone OEMs already use sapphire for the camera lens cover because of its scratch resistance, but also is used for the LEDs in the backlighting for the screens as well as the silicon-on-sapphire (SOS)-based RFIC chips that power the RF antennas. There are more places for use of sapphire in a smart phone as well since OEMS are looking to use SOS chips for digitally tunable capacitors (DTCs) and power amplifiers. And, don’t forget sapphire’s largest overall market, LEDs, for lighting, displays and more.

Apple claims that Touch ID reads a fingerprint at an entirely new level by scanning sub-epidermal skin layers with 360 degree reading capabilities.  The sensor is part of the home button which is 170 microns thick with a 500 ppi resolution.  Touch ID stores the encrypted fingerprint info securely in a “secure enclave” inside the new A7 chip, the new processor for the iPhone 5S.  The neat thing is that it should be able to store multiple fingers.  The Touch ID will enable you to purchase items on iTunes, the AppStore or iBooks without a password.

You can see where the sapphire is in this photo of the home button from CNet’s live blog of the Apple event:

iPhone 5S graphic illustrates parts of the Touch ID (from CNet)

iPhone 5S graphic illustrates parts of the Touch ID (from CNet) with sapphire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The iPhone 5S (and the 5C) go on pre-sale on September 13th and will be on sale in stores on September 20th.

For Further Reading

Engadget, iPhone 5S fingerprint sensor called Touch ID, recognizes your thumb on the Home button: here’s how it works and what it does, http://www.engadget.com/2013/09/10/iphone-5s-fingerprint-sensor/

 

Back to School with More LEDs

New LED Scoreboard at Allen High School, Allen, Texas

New LED Scoreboard at Allen High School, Allen, Texas

With most American students returning to school, we’ve put together a look at two schools that are taking advantage of LED lighting to save money and improve the learning environment.

Special Ed

LED lighting in special education classrooms creates a better learning environment.  The buzzing and flickering from fluorescent fixtures often bother or distract special education students.  Administrators from Cherokee Elementary School in Scottsdale, Arizona believe that LED light fixtures will help students focus more, particularly special education students.

With the help of MaxLite, Cherokee Elementary School replaced 69 2’x4’ fluorescent fixtures with 60 2’x2’ Direct Lit LED Flat Panels in four classrooms.  The move will save nearly 60 percent in energy consumption, plus reduce maintenance costs since the panels are designed to last 50,000 hours or up to 13 years.  In addition, the school received utility rebates for the energy conservation measures to help offset the cost of the lighting retrofit.

Extreme Stadium at Allen High School in Allen, Texas

Texans famously like their football, especially high school football.  Perhaps the most ambitious high school football stadium is in Allen, Texas.  Approved by voters in 2009, Allen High School set out to construct one of the largest high school football stadiums in the US.  Opening for the 2012 season, “Eagle Stadium” at the suburban Dallas high school features 18,000 seats (the band is 675 members alone), NaturalGrass Matrix turf, a 75-by-45 foot HD video scoreboard from Daktronics (that includes LEDs), a weight room, a press room and private boxes that rival some college football stadiums.  The new stadium worked, the Eagles were the 5A State Champions in 2012 with a record of 15 – 1.

For Further Reading

MaxLite, LED Lighting Helps Nurture Better Learning Environments for Special Ed. Children, http://www.maxlite.com/resources/CaseStudyGraphics/MaxLite_Cherokee.cs.20121023.pdf

The Huffington Post, Allen Eagle Stadium, New $60 Million High School Football Venue, Debuts In Dallas Suburb (PHOTOS), http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/08/dallas-suburb-unveils-new_n_1756434.html

Clearlysapphire.com, LED Lighting Goes Back-to-School, http://blog.clearlysapphire.com/?p=260