Rubicon Develops New Sapphire Growth Platform to Make Large Optical Windows

Sapphire Windows in Lockheed Martin f-35 Lightning Joint Strike Fighter

Sapphire Windows in Lockheed Martin f-35 Lightning Joint Strike Fighter

There are a lot of ways to make large commercial sapphire crystals.  But none of them really work for making large sapphire windows using sapphire’s a-plane. We mean really wide so that they can be used in a military plane as a targeting system window.  So, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) asked Rubicon Technology to develop a new growth platform for very large polished sapphire infrared (IR) windows.  The project is supported by a grant from the AFRL, with a total value of $4.7 million over three years.

Sapphire is perfect for military and other high-performance applications due to its hardness and strength, transparency in the visible and IR spectrum, thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, abrasion resistance, high melting point and chemical inertness.  The project will begin with intermediate sizes, then will step it up to windows as large as 36 x 18 x 0.8 inches.

Why do we need this new method?  Existing methods used to produce sapphire windows don’t meet the demands of military applications for thickness and size.  Rubicon’s new technological platform will grow panels approximately two inches thick, which can be cut into multiple windows of varying thickness.  The new method also allows growth of very large windows up to 36 x 18 inches. This is an improvement over smaller faceted windows that require piecing together for large applications.

The sapphire windows for the AFRL will be applied to fighter jet targeting systems. For example, the Lockheed-Martin F-35 Lighting Joint Strike Fighter’s fuselage has a durable sapphire window in the fuselage for use by the Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS).  The sapphire is preferred due to its durability, hardness and strength and the way it allows transmission light in the IR spectrum.

Links:

Lockheed-Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter, http://airsoc.com/articles/view/id/4fe4b7f8c6f8fa2443000009/lockheed-martin-f-35-lightning-ii-joint-strike-fighter

Clearlysapphire.com. http://www.clearlysapphire.com/Optical__Lasers_Windows_.html

Rubicon Technology, http://rubicon-es2.com/index.php?page_id=23

This entry was posted in Air Force Research Laboratory, Lockheed-Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter, Military, sapphire, sapphire crystal, sapphire window and tagged , , , , by Beth. Bookmark the permalink.

About Beth

It seems like LEDs are in everything these days – backlighting everything from your mobile phone, Apple iPad and flat screen HDTV to traffic lights, light bulbs and even the kitchen sink. But, making LEDs is a complex process that begins with the creation of sapphire. Not the pretty blue gemstone, but large commercial crystals that can weigh as much as 400 lbs. Once these large sapphire crystals are grown into boules and cooled, they’re cut into cores, cut further into flat circular wafers, polished and then used to grow LEDs. About 85 percent of HB-LEDs (high brightness) are grown on sapphire. There’s not that much information out there about the process. This blog is meant to shed some light (excuse the pun) on sapphire, LEDs and the industry that is devoted to making our lives just a little brighter. In the months ahead, we’ll tackle some topics that will help you understand a little more about sapphire and LED industry. Here’s a sample of what we’ll cover in the coming months: • Growing sapphire • For a wafer, size matters • Quality - When sapphire wafers go bad • LED light bulbs • Market & myths • Interviews with industry shining stars • Reports from industry events • Current events in perspective Please join us each week to learn more about sapphire and the LED market. We look forward to seeing you.

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  1. Pingback: New Applications for Sapphire: Aerospace & Defense, Part 1 of 3 | clearlysapphire