Sapphire Inside: Apple Builds Sapphire Lens into New Home Button, Touch ID

iPhone 5S with the Touch ID includes a sapphire lens

iPhone 5S with the Touch ID includes a sapphire lens on the home button

Today, Apple announced two new models of the iPhone, the iPhone 5S and  the iPhone 5C. One of the biggest news items at the Apple event is that the new iPhone 5S will sport a whole new home button with a fingerprint sensor with a sapphire lens, ringed in stainless steel.

Sapphire, the second hardest material on Earth after the diamond, is scratch resistant, so it should be very well suited for use as a lens. While this is great news for the sapphire community, this is not the only use for sapphire in a smart phone. Many smart phone OEMs already use sapphire for the camera lens cover because of its scratch resistance, but also is used for the LEDs in the backlighting for the screens as well as the silicon-on-sapphire (SOS)-based RFIC chips that power the RF antennas. There are more places for use of sapphire in a smart phone as well since OEMS are looking to use SOS chips for digitally tunable capacitors (DTCs) and power amplifiers. And, don’t forget sapphire’s largest overall market, LEDs, for lighting, displays and more.

Apple claims that Touch ID reads a fingerprint at an entirely new level by scanning sub-epidermal skin layers with 360 degree reading capabilities.  The sensor is part of the home button which is 170 microns thick with a 500 ppi resolution.  Touch ID stores the encrypted fingerprint info securely in a “secure enclave” inside the new A7 chip, the new processor for the iPhone 5S.  The neat thing is that it should be able to store multiple fingers.  The Touch ID will enable you to purchase items on iTunes, the AppStore or iBooks without a password.

You can see where the sapphire is in this photo of the home button from CNet’s live blog of the Apple event:

iPhone 5S graphic illustrates parts of the Touch ID (from CNet)

iPhone 5S graphic illustrates parts of the Touch ID (from CNet) with sapphire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The iPhone 5S (and the 5C) go on pre-sale on September 13th and will be on sale in stores on September 20th.

For Further Reading

Engadget, iPhone 5S fingerprint sensor called Touch ID, recognizes your thumb on the Home button: here’s how it works and what it does, http://www.engadget.com/2013/09/10/iphone-5s-fingerprint-sensor/

 

This entry was posted in Apple, Apple iPhone 5S, industrial sapphire, LED, LED Chip, LED industry, RFIC, sapphire, sapphire crystal, sapphire lens, Silicon on Sapphire, Smart Phone and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , by Beth. Bookmark the permalink.

About Beth

It seems like LEDs are in everything these days – backlighting everything from your mobile phone, Apple iPad and flat screen HDTV to traffic lights, light bulbs and even the kitchen sink. But, making LEDs is a complex process that begins with the creation of sapphire. Not the pretty blue gemstone, but large commercial crystals that can weigh as much as 400 lbs. Once these large sapphire crystals are grown into boules and cooled, they’re cut into cores, cut further into flat circular wafers, polished and then used to grow LEDs. About 85 percent of HB-LEDs (high brightness) are grown on sapphire. There’s not that much information out there about the process. This blog is meant to shed some light (excuse the pun) on sapphire, LEDs and the industry that is devoted to making our lives just a little brighter. In the months ahead, we’ll tackle some topics that will help you understand a little more about sapphire and LED industry. Here’s a sample of what we’ll cover in the coming months: • Growing sapphire • For a wafer, size matters • Quality - When sapphire wafers go bad • LED light bulbs • Market & myths • Interviews with industry shining stars • Reports from industry events • Current events in perspective Please join us each week to learn more about sapphire and the LED market. We look forward to seeing you.

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