Sapphire Industry Watch – April 24

  • UK’s ‘first’ aquaponic farm gets green light – Fresh Produce Journal: A London warehouse has been converted into a large-scale aquaponic farm that will use aquaculture and hydroponic technologies to grow enough salads and herbs for 200,000 bags of salad and approximately 4,000kg of fish per year.  Featuring specialized horticulture LED lighting, the farm is described as the first of its kind in the UK and is expected to produce its first harvest in September.
  • Rubicon Technology to showcase largest sapphire window ever produced at SPIE DSS – Market Watch: Rubicon Technology showcased the largest sapphire window ever produced at the SPIE DSS 2015 exhibition from April 20-24. Measuring in at 17 inches wide by 25 inches long and 1 inch thick, the sapphire window perfectly combines the durability and optical clarity necessary for use in defense applications.
  • Gov. Baker recognize Earth day with new LED program – 7News Boston: Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker celebrated Earth Day by announcing the state will be working to replace more than 5,000 outdoor lights with LEDs in an effort to reduce energy consumption and cost. The governor hopes this conversion will help Massachusetts become a national leader in the LED light movement.
  • Adaptalux uses octopus-like LED arms to illuminate your photos – Slash Gear: Adaptalux, a miniature portable lighting studio for videographers and macro photographers, uses magnetically-connected “arms” with LED lights on the end to illuminate subjects without overpowering them. The device can use a variety of lights and diffusers to ensure perfect lighting, along with controls to adjust beam angle and direction.

Earth Day 2014 – Companies Get Greener

Walmart goes for LEDs

Walmart goes for LEDs

In honor of Earth Day 2014, we’ll take a look at how some companies are leveraging LEDs to save energy, bring new aesthetics to their businesses and even save that other valuable resource, money.

Starbucks is committed to using LED lighting in their coffee houses globally. By 2010, Starbucks was able to complete installation in more than 7,000 company-owned stores in the United States, Canada, the UK, China and Singapore. According to Starbucks, This effort has helped reduce the company’s electricity consumption by 3.3 percent since 2008 along with other measures. In FY2011, the company said that electricity use had decreased by more than 7.5 percent since 2008 with a goal of 25 percent by 2015.

Most recently worldwide discount chain Walmart, along with their lighting vendor GE, announced that Walmart will convert to energy-efficient LED ceiling lighting fixtures for new supercenters in the United States, stores in Asia and Latin America, and Asda locations in the United Kingdom. The new fixtures will use 40 percent less energy than lighting sources historically used in stores, and will help the retailer achieve a 20 percent reduction in the kilowatt hour (kWh) per square foot of energy required to power Walmart’s buildings globally by 2020.

Philips worked with Harrods to convert their Wedgewood display to LED lighting in their famous department store in Knightsbridge, London. LEDs replaced halogen lamps in the chandeliers bringing the sparkle back to the Wedgwood area. The LED lighting provides a 74% reduction in installed electrical load, considerably lower heat gains and reduced maintenance requirements. “The chandeliers now look brilliant and the floor staff is very happy with the new candle lamps. We will be specifying them for all of the chandeliers throughout the store in the future,” said Mark Fleming, Harrods Engineering Technical Manager, in a Philips case study about the project.

The New England Aquarium (NEAQ) in Boston recently installed over 160 LED fixtures from Lumenpulse, a leading manufacturer of high-performance, architectural LED lighting solutions.  The project, by Lighting design firm Available Light, enhanced the overall visitor experience, improved animal care with a more naturalistic lighting approach, and even helped biologists curb the growth of algae in the NEAQ’s Giant Ocean Tank (GOT) through LED lighting.

Part of a six-year renovation of the NEAQ, the goal of the lighting project was to bring a sense of theatricality to the aquarium, highlighting the animals and coral reef with new dynamic lighting based on a unique WGB color mixing system that uses white, blue and green LEDs to show off the water while inhibiting algae growth.

“We learned that higher color temperatures are less conducive to algae growth,” said Matt Zelkowitz, Assoc. IALD, LC Principal at Available Light, in a press release. “Red light did not really penetrate or affect the water, while blue and green were magical in manipulating tonality.”

For Further Reading

LEDs Magazine, Starbucks converts US stores to LED lighting, http://www.ledsmagazine.com/articles/2009/11/starbucks-converts-us-stores-to-led-lighting.html

Walmart, Walmart and GE Transforming Retail Lighting with Energy-Efficient LEDs Globally, http://news.walmart.com/news-archive/2014/04/09/walmart-and-ge-transforming-retail-lighting-with-energy-efficient-leds-globally

Philips, Harrods, UK, http://www.lighting.philips.com/main/projects/harrods.wpd

LEDs Magazine, New England Aquarium recaptures spotlight with Lumenpulse LED lighting fixtures, http://www.ledsmagazine.com/content/leds/en/ugc/2013/10/new-england-aquarium-recaptures-spotlight-with-lumenpulse-led-lighting-fixtures.html

Tipping Point: Earth Day, 100W Light Bulb Reprieve and Alexander Hamilton

Last weekend, the world marked the 42nd anniversary of Earth Day and the world continues to look for ways to save energy and live a little bit greener every day.  LED lighting has been capturing a lot of mindshare as the next best energy-saving light source on the horizon since mercury-containing CFLs have lost favor. While the LED lighting market continues to build slowly, industry observers are keeping a keen eye on when it will explode.  Alexander Hamilton may have the answer.

In 2007, US legislators imposed strict energy efficient guidelines impacting 100W incandescent light bulbs.  The first set of regulations were set to hit in 2012, in effect banning traditional 100W light bulbs.  The “ban” was thought to help the LED lighting industry.  But, the 100W light bulb got a reprieve in December 2011 from Congress. In the midst of the holiday hustle and bustle, there was a little agreement inside of the massive 1,200-page spending package that took the teeth out of enforcing the incandescent light bulb ban. Incandescent bulbs were off the hook, temporarily.

Without the US government regulations spurring LED lighting adoption, it is anyone’s guess as to when consumer LED lighting will take off.   IMS analyst Jamie Fox recently wrote a post about LED lighting and the tipping point for consumer LED lighting adoption.  According to Fox, the residential market LED lighting is not quite ready to explode in 2012, but it is starting to get tantalizingly close.  Fox noted that residential LED lighting is the “holy grail” for LED manufacturers “who once saw it merely as a speck on the far horizon, but now can finally enjoy it coming squarely into view. If this market starts to suddenly move, then the whole market for LED general lighting, indeed the whole LED market, will really start to see growth rates increase, even surge.”

Fox and his associates at IMS calculate that LED light bulb prices need to fall to single digits before the market explodes.  Fox explained in his blog post, “It’s not just the psychological impact (i.e. $9.99 vs. $10.00); it also just happens that this is around the point where the payback arguments make sense. Factoring in energy costs, a $25 LED pays for itself relative to a $0.55 60W incandescent lamp in approximately 34 months assuming 4 hours of use per day and energy costs of $0.11 kWh.”  He continued that at $10 (Alexander Hamilton is on the $10 bill) or less, the payback period shrinks to a single year.

When this will happen is anyone’s guess, but Fox insists that the $10 mark will be good news for LED manufacturers.  He continued, “this translates into double digit growth for their whole LED business in 2013 and 2014.”

There is progress on pricing declines.  Market researchers at LEDinside indicate that they are seeing price drops in the vicinity of the $10 mark in South Korea, UK, Japan and United States due to competition and improvements in technology.  According to LEDinside, the 40W equivalent LED bulb’s prices in North America and the UK have been sliding toward US$10. The lowest prices in most areas are expected to fall below US$10 in 2H12.

Facts & Figures:

According to the US Department of Energy, artificial lighting consumes about 10% of a household’s electricity use.  The DOE says use of new lighting technologies can reduce lighting energy use in homes by 50%–75%. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home could save you about $50 per year. This could add up because the DoE says there is more lighting than ever in the US. The DoE attributes the vast majority of the growth to the residential sector, primarily due to the increase in number of households and the rise in the number of sockets per household, from 43 in 2001 to 51 in 2010.

For Further Reading …

IMS LED Blog, Doe LED Lighting Have a Tipping Point?, http://www.ledmarketresearch.com/blog/Does_LED_Lighting_Have_A_Tipping_Point_270

LEDinside.com, LED Bulb Price Dipped Sharply in 12’Jan, 40W Equivalent LED Bulb Price Dropped below US$10, http://www.ledinside.com/price_bulb_201201

USA Today, Congress’ bill may slow switch to efficient light bulbs, http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/lighting_daylighting/index.cfm/mytopic=11985

LEDs Magazine, US Congress is poised to weaken light-bulb efficiency legislation, http://www.ledsmagazine.com/news/8/12/18

The Washington Times, Congress overturns incandescent light bulb ban, http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/dec/16/congress-overturns-incandescent-light-bulb-ban/

US DOE Reports on Efficiency and Environmental Impact of LED Lighting

LED lighting has been hyped as the next best thing in lighting because of its energy efficiency. As Earth Day 2012 approaches, we would like to share the results of a new report from the US DOE, Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part I: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, and LED Lamps, February 2012.

Part 1 of the report focuses on a comparison of the energy consumption during the lifecycle of LEDs, CFLs, halogen and Incandescent light bulbs. The lifecycle is defined as the three major lifecycle phases: manufacturing, transportation and use.  The authors of the report took on a lot of work. The report is a comprehensive look at the energy consumption of the three light technologies based on ten existing studies from academia, manufacturers and independent researchers.

The results of the report were not surprising given the buzz about LEDs.  The use phase is the most energy intensive for all — incandescent, CFLs and LED lighting.  Transportation accounted for less than one percent of the lifecycle for all. The real differences occurred during the manufacturing phase with LEDs initially being higher due to the larger “packages” required to meet the equivalent lumens, or the amount of light.  These differences in the manufacturing phase will be eliminated by advances in LEDs over time.  For example, as LED technology improves with increases in yield, wafer size and automation in LED manufacturing, LEDs will become brighter requiring fewer, smaller “packages” to make the same amount of light, lumens.  Even given these initial differences in current LEDs, they all disappeared when totaling everything up throughout the lifecycle.

According to the authors of the report, “the key results of this analysis indicate that the average life-cycle energy consumption of LED lamps and CFLs are similar, at approximately 3,900 MJ per functional unit (20 million lumen-hours). This is about one quarter of the incandescent lamp energy consumption—15,100 MJ per functional unit.”  Further, the authors estimate that, “by 2015, if LED lamps meet their performance targets, their life-cycle energy use is expected to decrease by approximately one half.” This means that as LEDs become more efficient, they’ll outshine CFLs.

This all sounds like very good news for LEDs, but it still is very early. The report is the first report from a larger DOE project to assess the lifecycle environmental and resource costs to manufacture, use and dispose of LED lighting products versus comparable traditional lighting technologies.  Look for more from the DOE.

For Further Reading:

Clearlysapphire.com, LED Manufacturing, http://www.clearlysapphire.com/LED.html

US DOE, SSL Program, http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/ssl/index.html