Patriotic LEDs make holiday shine brighter

From the sun-kissed shores of the Golden State to historic harbors along the tip of Maine, skylines from sea to shining sea will proudly be glowing red, white and blue this weekend.

As Americans prepare to celebrate the day that marked their independence with barbecues, parades and pool parties, here’s a preview of the most spectacular patriotic fireworks and LED light shows the nation can expect to see on Saturday night.

Empire State Building — New York City, New York ESB

Since its LED makeover in late 2012, the lights on top of New York’s most iconic building have complemented Macy’s legendary Fourth of July fireworks production. Dancing, fluttering, sparkling and moving in endless combinations to classics like Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York”, the LEDs are timed to mirror the grand finale of the fantastic explosions that take place over the Hudson River.

Aside from Independence Day, the Empire State Building illuminates for several other special events and national holidays throughout the year, including pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month and green for St. Patrick’s Day. The Fourth of July collaboration with Macy’s, however, is by far the 102-story building’s biggest, most visible display yet.

Boston Pops — Boston, Massachusetts

Boston Pops

As is annual tradition, the Boston Pops Orchestra will perform a free concert at the Esplanade in Boston, Massachusetts, this July 4th. Each year, the show draws more than a half-million people to the patriotically lit Hatch Shell and is broadcast live on Boston’s local TV station, WBZ-TV.

Specializing in light classical music, the Boston Pops performs delightful tunes that help build anticipation for the city’s awe-inspiring fireworks choreography over the banks of the Charles River.

Walt Disney World— Orlando, Florida 

Castle

On July 3rd as well as the 4th, the Magic Kingdom theme park at Disney World will celebrate the traditions, spirit and music of the United States with a special 15-minute fireworks show and whimsical light display of the American flag on the iconic Disney castle. Using all perimeter firework sites, the show gives a 360-degree effect from inside the park while more than 1,500 shells will be launched.

When paired with spectacular aerial fireworks displays such as these in New York City, Boston and Orlando, the brightness and colors of LED lights help make special holidays shine that much brighter.

Happy Fourth of July from Rubicon Technology! 

 

The LED Takeover

Long before Rubicon Technology was manufacturing sapphire for LEDs, it was the incandescent light bulb that illuminated our world. More than one-hundred years ago – in 1879 to be precise -Thomas Edison patented the first incandescent light bulb, igniting the lighting industry and paving the way for the ‘world after dark’ that we enjoy today.

Because of the steady warm glow they produce, incandescent bulbs were soon found to be fitting for most household applications. Fluorescent tube lights, on the other hand, were later developed to produce brighter neon light and be more efficient, making them suitable for commercial applications, such as offices, hospitals and stores.

An outgrowth of the Germans’ 19th century invention of the Geissler tube, the first real challenger to the incandescent bulb for home use, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), hit the market in the mid-1980s. Although they were significantly more efficient than incandescent light bulbs, at a retail price of $25-$35, CFLs were also more expensive, deterring consumers at first from purchasing them.

Since the 1990s, however, improvements in CFL performance, price, efficiency and lifespan have led to a rise in their popularity – not to mention they became one of few lighting alternatives available after the phase out of the incandescent bulb began in 2014.

When it comes to which type of light bulb will reign as king in the 21st century, LEDs have undoubtedly stolen the spotlight from CFLs. In addition to being one of the fastest developing lighting technologies today, LEDs are currently the most efficient lighting source on the market.

The first visible-spectrum LEDs were invented in 1962 by Nick Holonyak in the form of red diodes. These initial LEDs first became available to the public in the form of indicator lights and calculator displays in the 1970s. The invention of the blue diode in the 1990s by American Shuji Nakamura, along with Japan’s Isamu Akasaki and Horoshi Amano, quickly led to the development of white LEDs.

Ever since the invention of the white LEDs, we have seen their use explode in a variety of applications. They are now being used in major national and international landmarks such as the Empire State Building and Sydney Opera House, transforming these buildings into energy-efficient and eco-friendly locations. In addition, LEDs have made notable appearances at major events this year all across the globe, including Super Bowl XLIX in the U.S. and Chinese New Year celebrations in both China and Malaysia.

Tower

Aside from the more conventional lighting applications, LEDs are also being utilized in the beauty and health industry. NASA developed LED facial technology that is said to plump up aging skin, boost collagen and treat acne. In Iran, LEDs are being used in the treatment of cancerous and precancerous skin lesions and could be used in the treatment of skin cancer in the future.

Facial

LEDs have the potential to affect the modern world even more than the original incandescent bulb did in the 20th century. As costs continue to fall and more out-of-the-box applications are discovered, it is clear there is no stopping LEDs from taking over the world.

Sapphire Industry Watch – March 13

  • Rubicon CEO Discusses Applications for Sapphire – NBC 5 Chicago: Bill Weissman, CEO of Rubicon Technology, discusses current uses of sapphire in every day applications such as LED lighting and mobile applications, as well as more unique uses like invisible braces and high-end razor blades. As Rubicon continues to experiment with ways to bring sapphire manufacturing costs down, there is enormous potential for new and exciting applications of sapphire in the future.
  • Are LEDs About to Take Over the World? – The Huffington Post UK: Although the first LED light was produced in 1962, it wasn’t until recently that increased sustainability efforts and lowering costs encouraged the widespread adoption of LEDs. From the Empire State Building’s lighting renovation to NASA’s development of LED facials, it is clear we are living in the age of the LED.
  • Auckland’s bridge lit up by 51 thousand bulbs – stuff.co.nz:  In celebration of the city of Auckland’s 175th anniversary, New Zealand’s iconic Auckland Harbour Bridge is being transformed into an interactive art, music and light show for the next six weeks. More than 51,000 LED light bulbs have been synced to music chosen by the public and performances can be watched in-person, and also via live stream on mobile phones and laptops.
  • San Diego School District Uses Prop 39 Funds for Energy Savings – Energy Manager Today: Thanks to $850,000 in funding from Proposition 39, the California Clean Energy Jobs Act, the Del Mar Union School District in San Diego will be replacing current light fixtures with longer-lasting LED light fixtures with occupancy sensors and dimming controls. The school district will also receive a rebate for the LED installations from San Diego Gas & Electric.

The LED Revolution in 2013 – Advances in LED Light

NY Times Square New Year’s Ball 2013, http://timessquareball.net/new-years-eve-ball-history/

The BBC recently put together a video about the LED Lighting Revolution that was jam packed with lots of information about the latest advances in LED lighting for 2013.  It also brings great video of LED upgrades to the Times Square New Year’s Ball in New York and the new LED lighting at New York’s Empire State Building that you might not have seen yet.

The New Year’s Celebration at New York’s Times Square is known worldwide for the crystal ball that has been dropped at midnight since 1907.  The ball, made by Philips and Waterford, got a makeover in 2007 when they changed the light source from incandescent bulbs to LEDs. But each year the LED-based ball gets a little bit better. The BBC video details how Philips and Waterford joined together to ensure that the legendary sparkle of the ball wasn’t lost with LED’s directional light.  The ball designers used special reflectors and baffles (seen in the video) to make sure the light refracts correctly with the crystal.

The 2013 Ball features 2,688 Waterford Crystal triangles bolted to 672 LED modules attached to an aluminum frame.  The Ball is illuminated by 32,256 Philips Luxeon Rebel LEDs. Each LED module contains 48 Philips Luxeon Rebel LEDs – 12 red, 12 blue, 12 green and 12 white to a total of 8,064 of each color. The Ball is capable of creating a palette of more than 16 million colors.

Not only does the ball look better, but the new ball brought energy savings 90% with double brightness by going LED in 2007. One year later, improvements saved 30 percent more energy.  The improvements have been so great that they keep the ball lit all year, every day.

The LED retrofit of the Empire State Building (ESB) was completed earlier this year, but the people at the BBC show the retrofit developed by Philips Color Kinetics in detail.  The new programmable LED light system brings 16 million colors. The old lighting system for the ESB meant 9-10 men manually changing large colored gel disks in a process that took all day. Now, the managers can update the new color palette – which can be daily — at a touch of a button.

Recently, we detailed the new 3-Way SWITCH LED Light Bulb at CES. The BBC video details how some SWITCH bulbs are made with a new liquid cooling system.  While most LED bulbs are air cooled, the people at SWITCH have developed a special liquid cooled LED bulb.  SWITCH’s advanced LQD Cooling System™ divides the bulb into two parts where half the bulb is a glass globe filled with silicon-based liquid to act as a cooling element.  The LQD Cooling System also includes a patented driver that is both reliable and highly efficient. SWITCH claims that their bulbs offer up to 40% better thermal performance than air-cooled LED bulbs.

The BBC video ends with a look at how 2013 will be different for personal, customizable LED lighting that can be controlled by a tablet or smart phone. Using an onscreen color palate or personal photo on a tablet, users can change the light from the LED lamp.

For Further Viewing

BBC, The LED Lighting Revolution, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/click_online/9782116.stm