Sapphire Industry Watch – March 6

  • Humble light bulb helps Japan fill nuclear gap – Chicago Tribune: When the Fukushima nuclear meltdown of 2011 resulted in the closure of many of Japan’s reactors, a national campaign was started to reduce energy consumption. Since the start of 2012, 73 million LED light bulbs have been sold in Japan, comprising about 30 percent of all bulbs sold there.  As LED adoption continues to increase, the country is also pursuing alternative energy sources such as solar power to help relieve the pressure caused by the shuttering of its nuclear energy program.
  • Revamped Dubai park to bask in the sunshine – Khaleej Times:  Al Khazan Park – which officially opened to the public on March 2 – has been revamped into Dubai’s first sustainable park. An off-grid solar power system and LED lights will reduce the amount of CO2 emissions annually by 44.5 tons, which is the equivalent to saving 1,100 trees.
  • Europe to have 2.9 bn general lighting LED lamp installations by 2019 – Greentech Lead: According to an ElectroniCast Consultants report, the number of LED lights installed for general lighting in Europe will grow at an average annual rate of 58.7 percent, rising from 288 million in 2014 to 2.9 billion in 2019. The European market is predicted to grow at a slightly faster rate than the U.S. market during the same time frame. Europe is expected to maintain its leadership in relative market share throughout the forecasted period.
  • SF Ferry Building Gets Makeover for World’s Fair Centennial Anniversary – ABC 7: To celebrate the centennial anniversary of the San Francisco World’s Fair, the iconic Ferry Building has been lit up the same way it was when the fair opened in 1915. Only this time the building will be lit up with nearly 1,100 energy efficient LED lights. The lights will stay up through December with two large beacons commemorating the year 1915.

Cities Worldwide Tap LEDs to Make Skylines Sparkle

The world’s skylines are changing. They’re no longer bathed in white light or neon. Thanks to new programmable LEDs, today’s city skylines are transformed into rainbows of light promoting good causes, events and company brands in every color imaginable that can change nightly.

But first let’s take a look at how lighting in cities got its start. Skylines and exhibitions played an early role in promoting lighting. Perhaps one of the most notable points in the history of lighting is the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893.

The Chicago World’s Fair in 1893 set the stage for promoting the wonder of electric lighting. In fact it was a big part in the race to light the world between Westinghouse backing Nicola Tesla (inventor of alternating current) and General Electric, owned by JP Morgan and Thomas Edison (inventor of light bulbs and direct current).

Westinghouse outbid Edison for the contract to light and power the fair. More than 200,000 white incandescent bulbs, using Tesla’s polyphase alternating current system, amazed crowds as they lit up the world’s fair at night. How did they beat out Edison? They under-bid Edison and GE banned them from using Edison light bulbs in retaliation for losing the bid. To light the fair, Westinghouse and Tesla sidestepped Edison’s light bulb patents with a new double stopper light bulb.

Here’s a photo from the Chicago World’s Fair at night. Just imagine how impressive this display of light must have been to a population used to gas lights and candles.

Chicago World's Fair 1893

Chicago World’s Fair 1893








Back to today. LED lighting systems have given rise to a whole new look to a city skyline. Here are a few of the more colorful city skylines bathed in LED lighting.

New York, New York

New York City Skyline

New York City Skyline

Hong Kong

Hong Kong Skyline

Hong Kong Skyline

Chicago, IL

Chicago Skyline

Chicago Skyline bathed in pink for Breast Cancer Month


Dubai Skyline

Dubai Skyline

For Further Reading

NY Post, City’s towers in LED arms race to get brightest spot in skyline,

City Lab, How LEDs Have Transformed the City Skyline,

NY Post, High-tech LEDs turning NYC skyline into a lightshow,