Sapphire Inside: Apple Builds Sapphire Lens into New Home Button, Touch ID

iPhone 5S with the Touch ID includes a sapphire lens

iPhone 5S with the Touch ID includes a sapphire lens on the home button

Today, Apple announced two new models of the iPhone, the iPhone 5S and  the iPhone 5C. One of the biggest news items at the Apple event is that the new iPhone 5S will sport a whole new home button with a fingerprint sensor with a sapphire lens, ringed in stainless steel.

Sapphire, the second hardest material on Earth after the diamond, is scratch resistant, so it should be very well suited for use as a lens. While this is great news for the sapphire community, this is not the only use for sapphire in a smart phone. Many smart phone OEMs already use sapphire for the camera lens cover because of its scratch resistance, but also is used for the LEDs in the backlighting for the screens as well as the silicon-on-sapphire (SOS)-based RFIC chips that power the RF antennas. There are more places for use of sapphire in a smart phone as well since OEMS are looking to use SOS chips for digitally tunable capacitors (DTCs) and power amplifiers. And, don’t forget sapphire’s largest overall market, LEDs, for lighting, displays and more.

Apple claims that Touch ID reads a fingerprint at an entirely new level by scanning sub-epidermal skin layers with 360 degree reading capabilities.  The sensor is part of the home button which is 170 microns thick with a 500 ppi resolution.  Touch ID stores the encrypted fingerprint info securely in a “secure enclave” inside the new A7 chip, the new processor for the iPhone 5S.  The neat thing is that it should be able to store multiple fingers.  The Touch ID will enable you to purchase items on iTunes, the AppStore or iBooks without a password.

You can see where the sapphire is in this photo of the home button from CNet’s live blog of the Apple event:

iPhone 5S graphic illustrates parts of the Touch ID (from CNet)

iPhone 5S graphic illustrates parts of the Touch ID (from CNet) with sapphire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The iPhone 5S (and the 5C) go on pre-sale on September 13th and will be on sale in stores on September 20th.

For Further Reading

Engadget, iPhone 5S fingerprint sensor called Touch ID, recognizes your thumb on the Home button: here’s how it works and what it does, http://www.engadget.com/2013/09/10/iphone-5s-fingerprint-sensor/

 

Rubicon Ships 400,000th Large Diameter Sapphire Wafer

Two-inch, Four-inch and Six-inch Sapphire Wafers

Today, Rubicon Technology, Inc. (NASDAQ:RBCN) announced that they shipped their 400,000th six-inch large sapphire wafer to the LED manufacturing and SoS/RFIC markets. Most of the world’s LED manufacturing takes place using sapphire – just as computer chip makers like Intel and AMD use silicon to make their microprocessors.

The most flashy, if you’ll pardon the pun, market for sapphire wafers is in LEDs, which are used for energy-efficient general lighting and as the source for backlighting in consumer products such as HDTVs, laptops, smart phones and tablets.  A second and significantly growing market for sapphire is its use in Silicon-on-Sapphire (SoS) Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits (RFICs).  SoS RFIC chips deliver high RF performance with low power consumption, a small form factor, and significantly reduced crosstalk in antenna applications that are pervasive in smart phones and other consumer devices.

Why large diameter wafers? Rubicon began developing large diameter sapphire wafers for SoS RFICs in the 2000s.  But the company soon tapped into the larger opportunity in the LED market, especially with LED-based general lighting. And, it’s all about the math.

The market has been dominated by two-inch wafers for years. The surface area of a six-inch wafer is nine times greater than that of a two-inch wafer, and its outer curvature is less, enabling greater use of the surface area, culminating in a reduction in edge loss.  In addition, use of larger wafers enables operational savings that offset the cost of the larger, thicker substrate and can help drive down the total cost of LEDs.  According to Rubicon, and depending on the type of MOCVD reactor used, LED chip manufacturers using six-inch wafer platforms may achieve up to 48% greater usable area per reactor run compared with two-inch wafers.

What does that mean? Larger diameter wafers will help LED manufacturers reduce costs throughout the manufacturing process in order to make LED-based lighting more affordable for consumers and encourage adoption worldwide.

Further Reading

Rubicon Technology, Rubicon Technology Ships 400,000th Large Diameter Sapphire Wafer; Company Continues Market Leadership Supplying Large Diameter Sapphire Wafers to LED and SoS/RFIC Markets, http://bit.ly/1117AIk